On Walking Alone

I got an unusual comment on Sycamore Canyon post, today. Someone thought walking alone there, to be boring.

It consequently occurred to me, that I have been writing few stories of solitude, or lone nude walks.  During the continuing “Nude Across America” trip, DF and I were glued together nearly 24/7 in a little Honda and our beds. Also, I am now away from my digs in Tortolita and immersed daily in the sounds of the city.

This website was never meant to be a weekly blog, but a repository of stories. It is to guide people into the joys of free range naturism and to share. I created a “Table of Contents” page up at the top to help navigate through all of this. I confess to not having been prompt about keeping up with the content there, but there is plenty.

There is a series there in the “Trip Reports” section of the Table of Contents, “My Private Place for Naturism.” There are 28 episodes, where I am walking nude and alone. These explain the wondrous quality of aloneness. There can be nothing boring.

A walk in nature is with nature. To be nude in nature is to be even closer. You might as well be holding hands with it. To walk freely to where your nose takes you in the moment is adventure in nature.

Alone, one can be more aware in every way, to feel inner reactions and guidance. When with someone else, there can be distraction. The roles of a social self can interfere with the being, just being, or in touch with the authentic self, or to be cast naked in the moment.

I understand what you mean about feeling bored when alone. I have experienced it. It is also important to not get stuck in social contexts and instead, to be alone.  There can be nothing boring about being alone in a natural place. If you seek people oriented things, go to where the people are.

DF and I are often alone when we are together hiking, during these reported trips. Then also, we share, too. We lag behind on the trail, we walk off, and we give each other space. We generally don’t talk, but instead we listen in the many ways.

Sycamore Canyon itself? If I were to find myself bored there, I’d leave all of my clothing behind, swim across the river, to walk the tracks. There may be danger to experience. There may just be the feeling of being very much more alive in my own skin.

Sure hope that the video works…there’s a learning curve, becoming proficient.

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6 thoughts on “On Walking Alone

  1. Reblogged this on Naturalian's Blog and commented:
    Just skin and nature being a part of nature can only be experienced naked and solitude is best.

    Like

  2. Pingback: On Walking Alone | EcoNudes

  3. David

    Video worked well, thank you…

    Like

  4. And that’s what I like !

    Like

  5. If you go over to FreeRangeNaturism.com forum, in the “Free Range” section there is a thread about this topic and article. Some lone, or solo, free range walkers with a good amount of experience have expressed their understanding of it all.

    Like

  6. Eric

    Very nice to see a video. It plays very well at 720p. I, too, love to hike alone, but it’s safer at my age (or at any age) and just as enjoyable to have like-minded companions who revere the present moment.

    Like

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